15 percent of people in the US are physically inactive, CDC report says

15 percent of people in the US are physically inactive, CDC report says

The new year may have motivated people to jot down their fitness goals, but a new country-wide map of inactivity in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), may show that this might not be feasible unless people start to become more physically active. In a new report by the CDC, over 15 percent of adults in all starts report leading a sedentary lifestyle, which means that they have little to no physical activity. Throughout the states of the country, the estimate of inactive constituents ranged between 17.3 to 47.7 percent. Image Credit: txking / Shutterstock Physical inactivity is defined as people who do not get the recommended level of regular physical activity. According to the American Heart Association (AHA) and the Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans recommend that adults get at least 150 minutes of moderate-intensity physical activity each week to promote cardiovascular health. The time allotted for exercise can be divided into smaller amounts, for instance, 25 minutes every day of 30 minutes five times a week. The activities that can be beneficial for overall health include, walking, exercising, running, or gardening, among others. By state, Colorado had the lowest number of people who live a sedentary lifestyle or physical inactivity at 17.3 percent, while Puerto Rico had the highest prevalence at 47.7 percent. According to U.S. regions, however, the West had the lowest prevalence at 20.5 percent while the South had the highest prevalence of physical inactivity at 28 percent. According to race, Hispanics had the greatest number of people with self-reported physical inactivity at 31.7 percent. Non-Hispanic blacks and non-Hispanic whites followed with prevalence rates of 31.7 percent and 30.3 percent, respectively. “Too many adults are inactive, and they may not know how much it affects their health. Being physically active helps you sleep better, feel better and reduce your risk of obesity, heart disease, type 2 diabetes, and some cancers,” Dr. Ruth Petersen, Director of CDC’s Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity, said in a statement. Related Stories



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