A first-in-human trial with promising MERS coronavirus vaccine

A first-in-human trial with promising MERS coronavirus vaccine

Download PDF Copy Reviewed by Emily Henderson, B.Sc. Apr 22 2020 Over the past 20 years, coronaviruses have been responsible for large outbreaks, resulting in severe respiratory illness and a number of deaths. These include the SARS coronavirus outbreak in 2002, the MERS coronavirus outbreak in 2012 and the SARS-CoV-2 outbreak which is currently rapidly spreading worldwide. Scientists at the University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf (UKE) and the German Center for Infection Research (DZIF) have now conducted a first-in-human trial with a vaccine against “MERS” (Middle East Respiratory Syndrome). The MVA-MERS-S vaccine was tolerated well and triggered the development of antibodies and T cell immunity. The results of this vaccine trial are also important and promising with regard to the development of a vaccine against SARS-CoV-2, the new coronavirus. The development of the MERS vaccine provides a basis upon which we at the DZIF can rapidly develop a vaccine against the new coronavirus." Prof. Marylyn Addo, Head of the Division of Infectious Diseases at the UKE and scientist at the DZIF The MERS coronavirus, identified for the first time in 2012, is listed on the World Health Organisation´s Blueprint list for pathogens that are considered a particular threat to public health. The virus is transmitted from dromedary camels to humans and is also transmissible between humans. Infections with the virus cause respiratory illness with a mortality of up to 35 percent. Worldwide, close to 2,500 cases of MERS have been detected in 27 countries with the highest numbers being in Saudi Arabia. To date, neither an effective vaccine against the MERS coronavirus nor a specific drug exist. The vaccine candidate MVA-MERS-S "In 2014, together with DZIF partners, we started to develop a vaccine against the MERS coronavirus in preparation for larger outbreaks of the virus in the future," Addo explains. The vaccine is based on an attenuated virus (MVA: modified vaccinia virus Ankara), which had previously been used in a smallpox eradication vaccination campaign and has now been altered to contain protein components from the MERS coronavirus. This recombinant, so-called vector-based vaccine, scientifically termed MVA-MERS-S for short, is to boost immunity against MERS coronaviruses. Prof. Gerd Sutter from Ludwig-Maximilians University of Munich developed this vaccine in collaboration with Philipps University of Marburg and the Erasmus Medical Center Rotterdam. The MVA vector now serves as a basis for developing a vaccine against SARS-CoV-2, the new coronavirus. The vaccine trial



Also in Industry News

How to decide whether or not to start treatment for prostate cancer?
How to decide whether or not to start treatment for prostate cancer?

0 Comments

How to decide whether or not to start treatment for prostate cancer?

Read More

Analysis of the SARS-CoV-2 proteome via visual tools
Analysis of the SARS-CoV-2 proteome via visual tools

0 Comments

Analysis of the SARS-CoV-2 proteome via visual tools

Read More

$65m investment increases British Patient Capital’s exposure to life sciences and health technology
$65m investment increases British Patient Capital’s exposure to life sciences and health technology

0 Comments

$65m investment increases British Patient Capital’s exposure to life sciences and health technology

Read More