A talk with your GP may reduce risk of getting cardiovascular disease

A talk with your GP may reduce risk of getting cardiovascular disease

Download PDF Copy Reviewed by Emily Henderson, B.Sc. Apr 14 2020 Having a general practitioner (GP) who is trained in motivational interviewing may reduce your risk of getting cardiovascular disease. But only if you do not already have diabetes or are at risk of developing it. This is shown by a new randomized study from Aarhus University. More than half of all Danes above the age of 55 suffer some form of cardiovascular disease. Most often the disease is caused by atherosclerosis of the arteries in the heart and brain. A study from Aarhus University now shows that a motivational interview with a GP can have a preventative effect. The results have just been published in the scientific journal BJGP Open . Our study suggests that motivational interviewing could be a promising method for reducing cardiovascular disease. As the name suggests, the purpose of motivational interviewing is to motivate the person to change their lifestyle, for example by exercising more, switching to a healthier diet or quitting smoking." Torsten Lauritzen, Aarhus University Trained in motivation The result derives from a survey which 175,000 patients aged 40-69 received from their general practitioner in connection with an initiative to fight diabetes. After completing the survey, each respondent could see whether he or she was at risk of having diabetes without knowing. All the people in the risk group were encouraged to contact their own GP, and almost 26,000 of them did so. A A quarter of these GPs were randomised and trained to carry out motivational interviewing, while the others provided advice in the normal way. The GPs who were trained in motivational interviewing were able to schedule a longer interview with the patient of around half an hour, and to follow up on normal consultations as required. No wagging fingers After eight years, figures were calculated for the number of deaths among the patients and the number who had developed cardiovascular diseases requiring hospitalisation. For patients with diabetes and a high risk of diabetes, no difference in the incidence of cardiovascular disease or mortality was found, regardless of whether they had one of the GPs who had been trained in motivational interviewing or not. The risk of cardiovascular disease was reduced by 13 per cent among the patients without diabetes who talked to a GP who had been trained in motivational interviewing, compared to the group of patients whose GP had not received the training. Related Stories



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