Alcohol Consumption Weakens Bones of People Living with HIV

Alcohol Consumption Weakens Bones of People Living with HIV

To fight Chinese outbreak, doctors deploy drugs targeting HIV, malaria and Ebola The researchers used data from 198 participants in the Boston ARCH cohort, a long-running study led by Saitz and funded by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism that includes people living with HIV and current or past alcohol or drug use disorder. For the current study, the researchers analyzed participants' blood samples, looking at biomarkers associated with bone metabolism (a life-long process of absorbing old bone tissue and creating new bone tissue) and a biomarker associated with recent alcohol consumption. They also used data from interviews in their analyses, and controlled for other factors such as age, sex, race/ethnicity, other substance use, medications, vitamin D levels, and HIV viral suppression. The researchers found a significant association between a participant's drinking and their levels of serum procollagen type 1 N-terminal propeptide (P1NP), a marker of bone formation. For every additional drink per day on average, a participant's P1NP levels dropped by 1.09ng/mL (the range for healthy P1NP levels is 13.7 to 42.4?ng/mL). Participants who drank more than 20 days out of each month also had lower P1NP levels than those who drank fewer than 20 days per month, and participants with high levels of the alcohol-associated biomarker also had lower P1NP levels. "If I were counseling a patient who was concerned about their bone health, besides checking vitamin D and recommending exercise, I would caution them about alcohol use, given that alcohol intake is a modifiable risk factor and osteoporosis can lead to fracture and functional decline," says Kim, who is also a primary care physician at the Boston Health Care for the Homeless Program. Source:



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