Bacteria may be involved in the development of type 2 diabetes, study shows

Bacteria may be involved in the development of type 2 diabetes, study shows

New model of glucose-responsive insulin could lead to better treatment for diabetes According to the study, the bacterial genetic material detected in the tissues most likely comes from the intestine. "We know that the intestinal barrier is more permeable in obese patients," said Professor Marette. "Our hypothesis is that living bacteria and bacterial fragments cross this barrier and set off an inflammatory process that ultimately prevents insulin from doing its job, which is to regulate blood glucose levels by acting on metabolic tissues." Fernando Forato Anhê, an author on the paper and a postdoctoral research fellow at McMaster, added: "Location, location location...Beyond knowing the names of bacteria, their location is key to understanding how gut microbes influence host metabolism." Professor Marette and his collaborators will be able to pursue their research further thanks to a $2 million grant they were recently awarded by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research. "Our next objective is to determine if the bacteria found in the liver and fat deposits of people suffering from severe obesity are also present in those who are overweight or moderately obese," said André Marette. "We also want to see if certain pathogenic bacteria found in the tissues can trigger type 2 diabetes in an animal model. And lastly, we want to find out if certain beneficial bacteria found in these tissues can be used to prevent the development of the disease. If so, they might lead us to a new family of probiotic bacteria or a source of bacteria-based treatments to help fight diabetes," he said. Source: Université Laval Journal reference: Anhê, F.F., et al. (2020) Type 2 diabetes influences bacterial tissue compartmentalisation in human obesity. Nature Metabolism . doi.org/10.1038/s42255-020-0178-9 .



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