Best practices shown to protect healthcare workers from COVID-19

Best practices shown to protect healthcare workers from COVID-19

GlobalData: Leading medical robots used by the healthcare industry 413 healthcare workers were treating these cases, of which 11 were exposed without proper or adequate protection. All 11 were placed in a 14-day quarantine. The investigators also took air samples from the area close to the mouth of a confirmed case, a patient with a moderate level of coronavirus in the blood. The samples were taken at different times: while speaking, while breathing normally, during heavy breathing, and while coughing. They also looked for the presence of the virus at various locations inside the room. The findings None of the healthcare workers exposed to the infection became ill. That fact shows that careful adherence to best practices of protection can successfully stave off the transmission of coronavirus in a healthcare setting. Secondly, the samples taken from the environmental air close to the mouth of a patient with the virus were, surprisingly, all negative, no matter how the patient was breathing, coughing, or speaking. The swabs from various objects and surfaces around the same room also proved negative, except for a window bench. An expert interpreted these findings as reassuring. Says infectious disease specialist Gonzalo Bearman (not part of the current study), “The descriptive study employed unique environmental and air samples with the results suggesting that environmental transmission may play less of a role than person to person transmission in disease propagation.” Person to person spread occurs between people in close contact, which is defined as within 6 feet or so. Another route of spread was thought to be through airborne droplets of respiratory secretion that fly through the air when a patient with COVID-19 coughs or sneezes. However, this latter mode of spread appears to be not a likely scenario in the current study. Most people are thought to be the most contagious if they are clearly sick with COVID-19. Asymptomatic cases may not spread it as quickly, and neither does it spread through fomites, or by touching surfaces with the virus on it, according to the current study. The scientists conclude: “Appropriate hospital infection control measures can prevent healthcare-associated transmission of the coronavirus. Vigilance in hand-hygiene practice, wearing surgical masks in the hospital, and appropriate use of personal protective equipment in patient care, especially when performing aerosol-generating procedures, are the key infection control measures to prevent hospital transmission of the virus.” Journal reference: Cheng, V., Wong, S., Chen, J., Yip, C., Chuang, V., Tsang, O., . . . Yuen, K. (n.d.). Escalating infection control response to the rapidly evolving epidemiology of the Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) due to SARS-CoV-2 in Hong Kong. Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, 1-24. doi:10.1017/ice.2020.58



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