Coronavirus app detects if you’ve been exposed

Coronavirus app detects if you’ve been exposed

The novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV) can spread rapidly, with at least a thousand new infections and a hundred of deaths each day. The epicenter of the outbreak, Wuhan in China, has been locked down since the peak of the outbreak. Now, Chinese officials say they’ve developed a new coronavirus app that tracks people and alerts them if they have been in close contact with the deadly virus. Coronavirus 2019-nCov, 3d illustration. Creativeneko / Shutterstock The National Health Commission of China has shared on its website that various government agencies, including the General Office of the State Council, and China Electronics Technology Group Corporations (CETC) developed the new mobile app , dubbed as the close contact detector. The close contact detector Released on Feb. 8, the app allows users to scan a QR code and submit their name, contact number, and ID number to see if they’ve come in close contact with someone infected with the coronavirus. They can scan a QR code via mobile apps like WeChat, QQ, or Alipay. With the help of the new mobile app, users can detect if they’ve come in close contact with an infected person while they were using public transportation, including planes, trains, and buses. Those who found they have been in contact, should stay at home and call their local health authorities. What is considered a close contact? Close contact is defined as someone who has come in close distance with infected people. These people don’t have effective protection such as masks and gloves. Close contacts also include individuals who work closely together or students in a classroom. People who live in the same household can also be tagged as close contact. Others include medical staff, people who stayed in the same room, or passengers in public utility vehicles such as buses, trains, and planes. Related Stories



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