Coronavirus can stay in the air for hours and surfaces for days – how to disinfect?

Coronavirus can stay in the air for hours and surfaces for days – how to disinfect?

UK lab looks for volunteers to be infected with coronavirus The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reports that the novel coronavirus is transmitted from one person to another when they come in close contact, within about 6 feet of one another. Scientists also noted that the transmission is akin to how influenza is spread through respiratory droplets when a sick person coughs or sneezes. The estimated incubation period is between two and 14 days, while most people develop the symptoms by 4 to 5 days after exposure. Health officials also noted that people could transmit the virus even if they have no symptoms, making contact tracing and virus spread control more difficult and tedious. The virus can also be transmitted by touching contaminated surfaces and then touching the face, particularly the nose, eyes, or mouth. The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that an infected person can transmit the virus to 1.4 to 2.5 people. In the current study, the scientists highlighted additional observations. They found that the viability of the two coronaviruses is similar, but the SARS-CoV-2 is causing more infections. Evidence shows that people can transmit the virus without them knowing it because they feel perfectly well. Asymptomatic individuals do not recognize the illness because they do not have symptoms, making disease control measures that were effective in the SARS outbreak in 2003, not effective in the current outbreak. Further, the team also found that the current outbreak, caused by the SARS-CoV-2, is occurring in the community setting rather than healthcare settings such as hospitals. However, the new coronavirus can also spread in hospitals since the virus is stable in the air for hours and surfaces for days. How to disinfect surfaces? The new study findings strengthen the already imposed guidelines and restrictions to curb the spread of COVID-19. To limit the virus spread, it is essential to avoid close contact with others who are sick, avoid touching the eyes, nose, and mouth, covering when sneezing or coughing and disposing the tissue properly, staying home when sick, self-isolating for those who are vulnerable, and cleaning or disinfecting frequently touched objects and surfaces, such as doorknobs, tables, and light switches. The CDC recommends that people should routinely disinfect frequently touched surfaces, including desks, toilets, faucets, tables, doorknobs, and handles, with household cleaners and EPA-registered disinfectants. Wear disposable gloves when disinfecting surfaces, and these should be discarded every after use. For disinfection, people can use 70 percent alcohol and diluted household bleach solutions. Dilute five tablespoons of bleach per gallon of water or four teaspoons bleach per quart of water. Never dilute bleach with ammonia or other cleansers. Regularly washing the hands is the most important means to fight the novel coronavirus. Wash the hands every after touching surfaces, after using the restroom, after blowing the nose, before eating or preparing food, before and after providing care for infants or another person who needs assistance. Sources: Bushmaker, T., van Doremalen, N.,Morris, D., Holbrook, M., Gamble, A. et al. Aerosol and Surface Stability of SARS-CoV-2 as Compared with SARS-CoV-1. The New England Journal of Medicine. https://www.nejm.org/doi/10.1056/NEJMc2004973 U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). (2020). Clean & Disinfect: Interim Recommendations for U.S. Households with Suspected/Confirmed Coronavirus Disease 2019. https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/prepare/cleaning-disinfection.html World Health Organization (WHO). (2020). Statement on the meeting of the International Health Regulations (2005) Emergency Committee regarding the outbreak of novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV). https://www.who.int/news-room/detail/23-01-2020-statement-on-the-meeting-of-the-international-health-regulations-(2005)-emergency-committee-regarding-the-outbreak-of-novel-coronavirus-(2019-ncov)



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