Coronavirus pandemic affecting the Earth's movement

Coronavirus pandemic affecting the Earth's movement

German scientists test TB vaccine against coronavirus Lockdowns were imposed to contain the spread of the virus, and if they continue in the coming months, the city-based detectors across the globe may be better at detecting the earthquake aftershock locations. "You'll get a signal with less noise on top, allowing you to squeeze a little more information out of those events," Andy Frassetto, a seismologist at the Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology in Washington DC, said. The reduced noise and seismic activity could benefit seismologists to study the Earth's crust through studying background vibrations. Also, quieter conditions, like for as long as seven months, can be a good thing. Noise pollution has been tied to various diseases such as sleep problems, stress-related disorders, high blood pressure, and other health problems. Scientists can have the unique opportunity to listen to the planet's natural sounds, without the background noise of people. This way, they can have baseline data for future studies. Further, without the noise people create due to daily activities, scientists can also detect smaller earthquakes, which are otherwise not heard. Coronavirus global numbers The coronavirus disease (COVID-19) has so far infected more than 1.27 million people and killed more than 69,000 people. The number will continue to rise as more countries grapple with the virus, with the United States being the hardest-hit country in the world. The U.S. has a staggering 337,274 confirmed cases as of writing and 9,633 deaths. Italy has reported 128,948 confirmed cases and 15,887 deaths, while Spain has moved up with 131,646 cases and 12,641 deaths. Germany has now topped 100,000 cases, while the United Kingdom has 48,440 cases and nearly 5,000 deaths. The World Health Organization (WHO) strongly recommends social distancing, contact tracing, and mass testing to curb the pandemic, which has impacted nations and economies. Most countries have imposed lockdowns in the effort to contain the virus . "The restrictions many countries have put in place to protect health are taking a heavy toll on the income of individuals and families and the economies of communities and nations. We are in a shared struggle to protect both lives and livelihoods," Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, WHO director-general, said. Sources: Coronavirus lockdowns have changed the way Earth moves - https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-020-00965-x Coronavirus COVID-19 Global Cases by the Center for Systems Science and Engineering (CSSE) at Johns Hopkins University- https://gisanddata.maps.arcgis.com/apps/opsdashboard/index.html#/bda7594740fd40299423467b48e9ecf6



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