Female veterans with PTSD more likely to suffer from ischemic heart disease

Female veterans with PTSD more likely to suffer from ischemic heart disease

Female veterans suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) were substantially more likely to have ischemic heart disease than those without PTSD in a study presented at the American College of Cardiology's Annual Scientific Session Together with World Congress of Cardiology (ACC.20/WCC). The new study is the largest and most comprehensive to date evaluating the association between PTSD and ischemic heart disease in women. Ischemic heart disease is a leading cause of death in the U.S. and includes heart attacks, chest pain and other problems caused by clogged or hardened arteries in the heart (a condition known as coronary heart disease) or abnormalities in smaller vessels. The association we found was incredibly strong. We have a rising number of women veterans, and a large proportion of them--nearly 1 in 5--have PTSD. These women are at high risk for heart disease, and what's more, they appear to be getting it at a younger age--even in their 40s. This is not something we can ignore." Ramin Ebrahimi, MD, a cardiologist affiliated with the Veterans Affairs (VA) Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System, professor of medicine at the University of California in Los Angeles and the study's lead author The researchers used a nationwide VA database to analyze health records from more than 835,000 female veterans who visited any VA facility at least twice between 2000-2017. On average, patients in the sample were just over 50 years old at the end of the study period. More than 150,000 (about 18%) had been diagnosed with PTSD. Overall, the women with PTSD had a 20% increased risk of having ischemic heart disease than those without PTSD. This association remained extremely strong and independent when researchers accounted for a comprehensive panel of risk factors--conditions or traits that could heighten the risk of heart disease--including age, elevated blood pressure, cholesterol, diabetes, obesity, chronic kidney disease, neuroendocrine disorders, psychiatric disorders, smoking and alcohol and illicit drug dependence. Ebrahimi said previous studies of PTSD and heart disease have typically accounted for fewer risk factors or assessed PTSD status based on symptoms rather than a documented diagnosis. The new study's unique methodology strengthens the evidence that PTSD is independently related to heart disease, rather than a relationship mediated by other health conditions or lifestyle factors. Related Stories



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