First glioblastoma patient treated with genetically modified poliovirus at UH

First glioblastoma patient treated with genetically modified poliovirus at UH

Reviewed by Kate Anderton, B.Sc. (Editor) Jan 24 2020 University Hospitals (UH) Seidman Cancer Center treated its first patient in a new clinical trial to validate the groundbreaking effects of the poliovirus on glioblastoma (GBM), a deadly Grade IV cancer of the brain. UH is the only Midwest site participating in this clinical trial, which was initiated at Duke Cancer Institute in Durham, NC. The original study, which ran from 2012-2017, was published in New England Journal of Medicine in July 2018 as well as highlighted on "60 Minutes" in 2015 and again in 2018. The study found that survival rates were significantly higher in glioblastoma patients who received an intratumoral infusion of a modified viral chimera combining the polio and rhinoviruses (PVSRIPO immunotherapy) compared to patients receiving standard treatment at the same institution. We are proud that University Hospitals was selected as one of a handful of top brain tumor centers such as the Massachusetts General Hospital and UCSF to participated in this Phase II clinical trial based on our expertise in immunotherapy and reputation for treating brain tumors. We want to offer this treatment opportunity to patients with recurrent glioblastomas who want to pursue groundbreaking alternatives that may improve their chances of survival from the most challenging of brain cancers." Andrew E. Sloan, MD, FAANS, FACS, Director of the Brain Tumor and Neuro-Oncology Center and the Center of Excellence in Translational Neuro-Oncology at UH Seidman Cancer Center and the UH Neurological Institute The 59-year-old man first enrolled in this trial suffered from glioblastoma that recurred after initial surgery and treatment. Following a biopsy to verify the progression of the brain tumor, Dr. Sloan placed a catheter into the tumor and the modified attenuated poliovirus was convected through the catheter into the tumor the next morning. Through this process, known as convection enhanced delivery (CED) and performed in the NeuroIntensive Care Unit at UH Cleveland Medical Center, the poliovirus attacks the tumor creating an anti-tumor immune response. The patient went home the next day. Related Stories



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