Grip strength metrics may be useful screening tool for diabetes risk

Grip strength metrics may be useful screening tool for diabetes risk

Maintaining VDR levels in pancreatic cells could protect against diabetes Researchers analyzed survey data from the 2011-2012 and 2013-2014 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey to establish normalized grip strength (grip strength relative to body weight) cut points for T2DM risk. Inexpensive portable handgrip dynamometer devices were used to determine hand and forearm strength. After controlling for sociodemographics (i.e., race/ethnicity, education, poverty, sex, and age), lifestyle factors (i.e., sedentary behavior, alcohol use, and smoking status), and waist circumference, the investigators identified the grip strength levels of at-risk patients who were otherwise healthy. These levels are presented with age- and sex-specific grip strength cut points that correspond to varying body weights to increase the ease of use for practitioners as indicators of when further diabetes diagnostic testing is warranted. For example, the cut point for women aged 50-80 years is 0.49. This means that if a 60-year old woman's combined grip strength from left and right hands was 43 kg, and her body weight was 90 kg, her normalized grip strength would be 0.478. Since this value is less than 0.49, this indicates that she is at increased risk for diabetes and further screening is warranted. "Given the low cost, minimal training requirement and quickness of the assessment, the use of the normalized grip strength cut points in this paper could be used in routine health screenings to identify at-risk patients and improve diagnosis and outcomes," added Dr. Brown. "This type of impactful research can make a difference for practitioners and individuals and is a key focal point of what Oakland University is all about. We are trying to improve the health and wellbeing of individuals." Source: Elsevier Journal reference: Brown, E.C., et al. (2020) Grip Strength Cut Points for Diabetes Risk Among Apparently Healthy U.S. Adults. American Journal of Preventive Medicine . doi.org/10.1016/j.amepre.2020.01.016 .



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