Having fewer children helps Chinese women to achieve higher levels of education

Having fewer children helps Chinese women to achieve higher levels of education

by www.news-medical.net February 14, 2020 0 Comments

A new study uses China's one-child policy to show that having fewer children leads women to achieve higher levels of education. The research found that the one-child policy alone accounted for about half of the additional education that women in China achieved after the policy was put in place. The findings suggest that some Chinese women anticipated having fewer children due to the one-child policy and they postponed marriage and postponed having children while they increased their education." Xuan Jiang, postdoctoral researcher in economics at The Ohio State University Jiang's study was published recently in the journal Contemporary Economic Policy . Population data collected by the Chinese government since 2010 made it possible for Jiang to analyze how fertility decisions affect education in women. There has been no other way to study the issue in this way before, she said. As such, she emphasized that the study is not defending the one-child policy, which critics say led to human rights abuses. Moreover, the results may have broader implications beyond China for explaining the link between motherhood and education. "Economists have wanted to know why the education gap between men and women has closed in many countries. This study shows that reductions in fertility may play an important role," she said. Jiang used data from the ongoing Chinese Family Panel Studies, a nationally representative annual longitudinal survey conducted by Peking University and funded by the Chinese government. China's one-child policy was instituted in 1979 to control the country's rapidly growing population. But it didn't apply equally to all groups. This study focused on the Han, the ethnic majority in China who were most strictly controlled by the law. Jiang compared two groups: an older generation (born 1950-1959) whose education decisions would not have been affected by the one-child policy and a younger generation (born 1960-1980) whose decisions would be impacted. Overall, while men born in 1950 had significantly more education than women born that year, men and women born in 1980 had about equal levels - nearly nine years of schooling. Jiang first compared Han women versus Han men from older and younger generations. The results showed that, after taking into account other factors that could have affected educational attainment, the one-child policy was responsible for increasing Han women's years of schooling by 1.28 years compared to Han men. That explains 53 percent of the 2.38-year increase in education attainment of women born between 1950 and 1980. Related Stories



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