Hendra antibody trial shows promise in a world-first human clinical trial

Hendra antibody trial shows promise in a world-first human clinical trial

New antibody shows promise in active lupus “Given the high death rate from infection by henipaviruses, their ability to cause infection in multiple organs including the brain, and their unique ability to spread to humans from bats via a wide range of animal species including horses and dogs, doctors need a safe way to neutralize them,” Dr. Elliott Geoffrey Playford from Princess Alexandra Hospital, Australia, said in a statement. "Our results are the first to confirm that administering an antibody that binds to the virus is safe, making it the most promising therapeutic option to date for addressing this unmet medical need,” he added. Therapeutic antibody efficacy The therapeutic antibody, called the m102.4, was developed by Professor Chris Broder and his team. It works by blocking the virus’s entry to healthy human cells, activating the immune system to combat it. The m102.4 has shown to successfully neutralize henipaviruses in previous experiments in non-human subjects. It works by binding to proteins on the surface of viruses that would typically allow the virus to conquer host cells and trigger an infection. In the current study, the team wanted to assess the safety of the antibody in humans and to see what happens to it as it travels through the body. They found that the m102.4 doses used in the study were safe and well-tolerated by healthy participants. There were no serious or adverse effects and in blood tests, the team found that the antibody remained active for at least eight days after administration. “When there's a possible case of henipavirus infection or people suspect they might have been exposed to one of the viruses, there often isn't time to confirm a diagnosis before it could become too late to do anything about it," Dr. Heidi Carroll from Queensland Health, Australia, said. "Based on the results of our trial, we suggest offering a single dose of 20mg/kg of m102.4 to people likely to have been exposed to one of the viruses, or two doses separated by 48 hours to patients with clinical signs of infection,” she added. Larger scales The production of the Hendra virus therapeutic antibody could be expanded to make the treatment for the deadly virus in larger scales. The ability to produce these antibodies, combined with formal regulatory green light as a result of promising clinical trials, will play a huge role in addressing the impact and spread of these diseases. What is the Hendra virus? The Hendra virus causes respiratory and neurological disease in both horses and humans, while its natural reservoir is fruit bats, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reports. The transmission is through exposure to body fluids and tissues or excretions of infected horses. There have been no reports of any case of human-to-human transmission. The signs and symptoms of the infection include respiratory illness with flu-like symptoms. In worse cases, a person infected may develop encephalitis. Journal reference: Safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and immunogenicity of a human monoclonal antibody targeting the G glycoprotein of henipaviruses in healthy adults: a first-in-human, randomised, controlled, phase 1 study Playford, Elliott Geoffrey et al. The Lancet Infectious Disease, https://www.thelancet.com/journals/laninf/article/PIIS1473-3099(19)30634-6/fulltext



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