High-income and low-income countries have major differences in CHD prevalence, mortality

High-income and low-income countries have major differences in CHD prevalence, mortality

Study: Weight loss surgery may reduce risk of heart failure, hypertension and early death A 34.5% decline in deaths from congenital disease between 1990 to 2017. Nearly 70% of deaths caused by CHD in 2017 (180,624) were in infants less than one year old. Most CHD deaths occurred in countries within the low and low-middle socio-demographic index (SDI) quintiles. Mortality rates get lower as a country's SDI rises. Birth prevalence of CHD was not related to a country's socio-demographic status, but overall prevalence was much lower in the poorest countries of the world. This is because children in these countries do not have access to life saving surgical services. Nearly 12 million people are currently living with CHD globally, 18.7% more than in 1990. The burden of CHD is not fully realized by just looking at prevalence and mortality. The measure "Years of Life Lost" provides deeper insight into the staggering burden of CHD, taking into account both absolute mortality and age at death. "In high income countries like the United States, we diagnose some heart conditions prenatally during the 20-week ultrasound," says Dr. Martin, a pediatric cardiologist at Children's National Hospital who contributed to the study. "We catch others right after birth with a pulse oximetry screening for critical congenital heart disease. We can operate to correct a critical issue within the first week of life. And now our CHD kids are growing and thriving through adulthood and having families of their own." For children born in middle- and low-income countries, these data draw stark attention to what we as cardiologists already knew from our own work in these countries--the lack of diagnostic and treatment tools leads to lower survival rates for children born with CHD. This is one of the most significant publications I have been a part of as it highlights the substantial loss of life to CHD in infancy around the globe." Dr. Craig Sable, Cardiology Associate Chief The authors write, "The UN has prioritized reduction of premature deaths from heart disease, but to meet the target of 'ending preventable deaths of newborns and children under 5 years of age,' health policy makers will need to develop specific accountability measures that address barriers and improve access to care and treatment." The study also includes a 400-page appendix breaking down each area by type of congenital anomaly, world region and country. Source:



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