Longer sitting times linked to higher heart disease risk among post-menopausal women

Longer sitting times linked to higher heart disease risk among post-menopausal women

Longer sitting times were associated with higher levels of heart disease risk among overweight and obese post-menopausal women overall, according to new research published today in the Journal of the American Heart Association , the open access journal of the American Heart Association. In this observational study, researchers measured the sitting habits of older women (after menopause; age ≥55 years) and who were overweight or obese. Data from study participants was analyzed as a single group and by two ethnic groups - Hispanic women or non-Hispanic women - in order to determine if total sitting time and/or average uninterrupted sitting periods may have an impact on heart disease risk factors and whether these relationships varied by ethnicity. From this data, the average total sitting time per day and the average time that participants spent in periods of uninterrupted sitting were calculated. Post-menopausal Hispanic women sat, on average, almost one hour less per day than non-Hispanic women of the same age group. They also spent significantly less time in uninterrupted sitting. However, each additional 15-minute increase in uninterrupted sitting was linked with about a 5% higher fasting blood sugar in Hispanic women, compared to a less than 1% increase in non-Hispanic women. The study included a total of 518 women with an average age of 63 years and an average body mass index (BMI) of 31 kg/m2 (the clinical definition of obesity is a BMI ≥30). Study participants wore accelerometers on their right hip for up to 14 days, removing the devices only to sleep, shower or swim. The accelerometers were used to track and record sitting and physical activity of the study participants throughout the day. A single blood test, concurrent with accelerometer wear, measured blood sugar and insulin resistance. "We were surprised to observe such a strong negative link between the amount of time spent sitting and insulin resistance, and that this association was still strong after we accounted for exercise and obesity," said lead study author Dorothy D. Sears, Ph.D., professor of nutrition at the Arizona State University College of Health Solutions in Phoenix. Insulin resistance is a strong risk factor for both cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. Related Stories



Also in Industry News

How to decide whether or not to start treatment for prostate cancer?
How to decide whether or not to start treatment for prostate cancer?

0 Comments

How to decide whether or not to start treatment for prostate cancer?

Read More

Analysis of the SARS-CoV-2 proteome via visual tools
Analysis of the SARS-CoV-2 proteome via visual tools

0 Comments

Analysis of the SARS-CoV-2 proteome via visual tools

Read More

$65m investment increases British Patient Capital’s exposure to life sciences and health technology
$65m investment increases British Patient Capital’s exposure to life sciences and health technology

0 Comments

$65m investment increases British Patient Capital’s exposure to life sciences and health technology

Read More