Medicines for All Institute partners with South African manufacturer to increase access to lifesaving drugs

Medicines for All Institute partners with South African manufacturer to increase access to lifesaving drugs

The Medicines for All Institute has entered into a partnership with a manufacturer in South Africa to commercialize advances made by the institute to improve access to lifesaving medications for HIV/AIDS and other diseases. The institute, which has successfully developed cost-saving formulas for key anti-HIV drugs, is based at Virginia Commonwealth University and its College of Engineering in Richmond, Virginia. Officials at VCU and Chemical Process Technologies Pharma Ltd. recently signed a three-year agreement outlining their collaboration. The South African company will validate and scale up processes developed by Medicines for All and serve as a test site for increased production. The institute will work with the company to develop new processes and technologies. "We see this as a beneficial collaboration for both parties," said Perrer Tosso, Ph.D., global innovation manager for Medicines for All. The institute seeks to have its processes implemented in low-income countries, especially in Africa. CPT Pharma does not have to start from scratch to develop new processes. "The manufacturer has the opportunity to adopt our processes and carry them through commercialization," he said. Both partners hope the cooperation will lead to lower drug costs in the local market -- and ultimately, the global market. CPT Pharma, based in Waltloo, Pretoria, South Africa, is a wholly owned subsidiary of Chemical Process Technologies, which has been manufacturing animal health products and animal health active pharmaceutical ingredients since 2001. In 2014, CPT began expanding its business into human health. With support from South African government agencies, it opened a four-story pilot plant in Pretoria in 2017 to manufacture generic active pharmaceutical ingredients. Hannes Malan, Ph.D., managing director of CPT Pharma, said he was intrigued when he heard about the institute's groundbreaking work on the anti-HIV medication nevirapine. South Africa is home to the world's largest AIDS epidemic and relies on medications that are imported. Related Stories



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