Microbiome in dermis skin layer is the same regardless of age and gender

Microbiome in dermis skin layer is the same regardless of age and gender

In the dermis skin layer, the same bacteria are found across age and gender. This has been shown by researchers from the University of Copenhagen in a new study which has studied skin samples from knees and hips. The researchers hope it is a step in the direction of a better understanding of why skin disorders occur. The bacterial microbiome on the skin has been compared to a fingerprint: Unique to each person. This does indeed apply to the epidermis, the outer layer of skin. But further down, in the layer of skin called dermis, we are all alike and have the same bacteria. This is shown by researchers from the University of Copenhagen in a new study, published in the scientific journal mBio . We found that the microbiome in epidermis is unique. It is very different and depending on age and gender. On the other hand, the microbiome in dermis is the same - regardless of age and gender. This has not been shown before." Lene Bay, co-author, Postdoc at the Department of Immunology and Microbiology, University of Copenhagen The researchers have studied skin samples from knees and hips. They have received the samples from Danish patients who were to have knee surgery. All the operations were so-called primary operations, that is, the patients did not have an infection on beforehand and were healthy. Importance for skin disorders The results have an impact on our understanding of the skin and its bacteria. According to the researchers, this knowledge is important if we are to become better at treating skin disorders such as childhood eczema and psoriasis and understand why they occur. "It is important that we drop the assumption that we are all different, and that the microbiome of the skin does not matter very much. We do know that bacteria play a major role in skin disorders. Therefore, we need to understand the bacteria and the skin in its three dimensions," says co-author Thomas Bjarnsholt, Professor at the Department of Immunology and Microbiology, University of Copenhagen. Related Stories



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