New handheld 3D skin printer accelerates healing of large burn wounds

New handheld 3D skin printer accelerates healing of large burn wounds

Scientists use supercomputers to shed light on skin cancer formation mechanism The paper is a major step forward for the team, which unveiled the first prototype of the skin printer in 2018. The device was believed to be the first device of its kind to form tissue in situ, depositing and setting in place in two minutes or less. "Previously, we proved that we could deposit cells onto a burn, but there wasn't any proof that there were any wound-healing benefits -- now we've demonstrated that," says Guenther. The current method of care for burns is autologous skin grafting, which requires transplantation of healthy skin from other parts of the body onto the wound. But large, full-body burns pose a greater challenge. Full-thickness burns are characterized by the destruction of both the outermost and innermost layers of the skin; these burns often cover a significant portion of the body. "With big burns, you don't have sufficient healthy skin available, which could lead to patient deaths," says Jeschke. Since 2018, the printer has gone through 10 redesigns, as the team moves towards a design they envision surgeons using in an operating room. The current prototype includes a single-use microfluidic printhead to ensure sterilization, and a soft wheel that follows the track of the printhead, allowing for better control for wider wounds. Next, Cheng says that they ultimately want to "further reduce the amount of scarring, on top of helping with wound healing. Our main focus moving forward will be on the in-vivo side." Jeschke believes the handheld skin printer could be seen in a clinical setting within the next five years. "Once it's used in an operating room, I think this printer will be a game-changer in saving lives. With a device like this, it could change the entirety of how we practice burn and trauma care." Source: University of Toronto Faculty of Applied Science & Engineering Journal reference: Cheng, R.Y., et al. (2020) Handheld instrument for wound-conformal delivery of skin precursor sheets improves healing in full-thickness burns. Biofabrication . doi.org/10.1088/1758-5090/ab6413 .



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