New noninvasive way to monitor the health of brain cells using an infrared laser

New noninvasive way to monitor the health of brain cells using an infrared laser

With no way to reliably tell whether an athlete has a concussion, many may be playing with an undiagnosed injury. Likewise, 2 million people die every year because we don't have an early warning when brain cells are dying--and another 4 million experience cognitive disabilities. Now, a team of doctors and engineers has developed a noninvasive way to measure whether brain cells are in distress using an infrared laser. Their device uses optical fibers to deliver pulses of infrared light to a person's forehead. This light can penetrate through the skin and skull to the brain without doing harm. It interacts with an important molecule for metabolism called cytochrome C oxidase, or CCO. While existing technology can give real-time information on whether the brain is getting oxygen, this new device gives information about whether the brain cells are able to use that oxygen. This information could enable concussions to be diagnosed on the sidelines of an athletic event. Alternatively, it could provide rapid feedback as doctors adjust treatment in the ER, operating room or the intensive care unit. Mohammed Islam, professor of electrical engineering and computer science, will present the study on Super Bowl Sunday at the Photonics West conference in San Francisco. He and his collaborators at Michigan Medicine, the School of Kinesiology and the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts told us about how the new technique works. What kinds of patients could this help? Steven Broglio, director of the Michigan Concussion Center and professor athletic training: Concussions in athletics have been in the spotlight for the previous decade, but soldiers are also at high risk. Concussion can happen to anyone. At present, there is no one test that can diagnose a concussion. There's no scan, no blood test, no computer test. We currently rely on a clinical exam and interpretation by the medical provider, so the diagnosis is subjective. We believe this technology is the first step in changing that by measuring brain metabolism, potentially resulting in faster and more certain diagnoses. The quicker you identify a concussion, the faster you can begin the recovery process of resting and gradually returning to normal activity. Research in the last 10 years has shown that resting sooner can shorten recovery time, helping people get back to school, work and military duty. Rachel Russo, a trauma and emergency surgeon and clinical lecturer: This device could guide the treatment of more serious brain injuries and other conditions that put the brain at risk. In its broadest application, it could help patients whose blood pressure falls so much that there isn't enough blood flow to keep cells functioning normally. This can happen when a person is very ill or because they have lost too much blood. We need to keep them in the 'Goldilocks zone'--their blood pressure has to be high enough to supply oxygen to the cells and low enough to discourage bleeding in injured tissues. In the ER and the intensive care unit, or ICU, patients are sometimes kept in medical comas while they heal from traumatic brain injuries. This would be the first device that could measure how well their brain cells are doing right in the hospital room. What does measuring cytochrome C oxidase tell you? Ioulia Kovelman, associate professor of psychology: It can tell us if the tissue is healthy and is metabolizing or "eating" properly--such as a brain of a healthy individual versus the brain of a person who suffered a concussion or has Alzheimer's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) or other types of brain dysfunction or trauma. Related Stories



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