Newly discovered antibiotics kill bacteria differently

Newly discovered antibiotics kill bacteria differently

Gut bacteria composition and diversity linked to human personality traits The two new antibiotics are known as glycopeptides. The team studied the genes of the group to see if they lack resistance mechanisms. The team believes that if the genes that made these drugs different, perhaps the way they kill will also be different. In collaboration with scientists from the Université de Montréal, including Yves Brun, they found that the drugs act on the bacterial cell wall to prevent it from dividing and proliferating. "Knowing the detailed structure at the atomic level of this connection between the surface layer and the surface of the cell offers enormous potential to then develop molecules that can target this attachment and make the cell more sensitive to antibacterials," Yves Brun , study co-author, said. "Combined with the discovery of the new mode of action of two antibiotics, this development opens up prospects for weakening the action of bacteria and making them more vulnerable," he added. The researchers believe the group of drugs is a promising clinical candidate in the hopes of stemming bacteria from becoming resistant to antibiotics. Fight against antibiotic resistance Antibiotic resistance is one of the greatest threats to global health, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). Though it happens naturally, the misuse of antibiotics is hastening the process, making it easy to treat infections in the past harder to curb now. Further, antibiotic resistance increase hospital stays and medical costs. For instance, diseases in the past that were responsive to certain antibiotics may become resistant and difficult to stem, such as tuberculosis, pneumonia, gonorrhea, and other infections. Now, as the diseases become stronger and more resilient, outbreaks may become inevitable, unless new drugs are discovered. In the United States alone, at least 2.8 million people become infected with antibiotic-resistant bacteria each year, while more than 35,000 people die. Sources: World Health Organization (WHO). (2018). Antibiotic Resistance. https://www.who.int/news-room/fact-sheets/detail/antibiotic-resistance U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). (2019). About Antibiotic Resistance. https://www.cdc.gov/drugresistance/about.html Journal reference: Culp, E., Waglechner, N., Wang, W., Fiebig-Comyn, A., Hsu, Y., Koteva, K., Shychantha, D., Coombes, B., Nieuwenhze, M., Brun, Y., and Wright, G. (2020). Evolution-guided discovery of antibiotics that inhibit peptidoglycan remodeling. Nature. https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-020-1990-9



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