'Off-the-shelf' artificial cardiac patch improves heart attack recovery in rat and pig models

'Off-the-shelf' artificial cardiac patch improves heart attack recovery in rat and pig models

Excess cardiac myosin worsens damage to heart tissue during a heart attack Cheng and colleagues from NC State and UNC-Chapel Hill built the patch by first creating a scaffolding matrix from decellularized pig cardiac tissue. Synthetic cardiac stromal cells - made of a biodegradable polymer containing cardiac stromal cell-derived repair factors - were embedded in the matrix. The resulting patch contained all of the therapeutics secreted by the cells, without live cells that could trigger a patient's immune response. In a rat model of heart attack, treatment with the artificial cardiac patch resulted in ~50% improvement of cardiac function over a three-week period compared to non-treatment, as well as a ~30% reduction in scarring at the injury site. The researchers also conducted a seven-day pilot study of heart attack in a pig model, and saw ~30% reduction in scarring in some regions of the pig hearts, as well as stabilized heart function, compared to non-treatment. Additional experiments demonstrated that artificial patches that had been frozen were equally potent to freshly created patches. "The patch can be frozen and safely stored for at least 30 days, and since there are no live cells involved, it will not trigger a patient's immune system to reject it," Cheng says. "It is a first step toward a truly off-the-shelf solution to cardiac patch therapy." The research appears in Science Translational Medicine , and was funded by the National Institutes of Health and the American Heart Association. Cheng is corresponding author. Ke Huang, formerly a graduate student at NC State and currently a postdoctoral scientist at Duke University, is first author. Source: North Carolina State University Journal reference: Huang, K., et al. (2020) An off-the-shelf artificial cardiac patch improves cardiac repair after myocardial infarction in rats and pigs. Science Translational Medicine . doi.org/10.1126/scitranslmed.aat9683 .



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