Penguins' speech pattern similar to human | InvestorBits

Penguins' speech pattern similar to human | InvestorBits

NYU study provides better understanding of youth vaping patterns Zipf’s law states that sounds used more often in a language tend to be shorter, while the second says that longer language units (for instance, longer words in English) tend to be made up of shorter sounds (compare the complex-sound single-syllable word “strength” with the simple-sounding polysyllabic word “parameterise”). This example was cited by linguist Chris Kello who specializes in discovering language patterns. The study says, “This is the first compelling evidence for conformity to linguistic laws in vocal sequences of a non-primate species. As predicted, we found that the duration of the syllables was inversely correlated with the frequency of occurrence.” Implications The researchers think their findings show that the laws of language are not just or primarily about language as such, but about language as a means of communicating information. The fact that the laws followed by penguin calls have nothing to do with semantics (the meaning of language) or syntax (the grammatical structure of language) shows, they say, that their basic purpose is to share information with maximum efficiency. In addition, the use of language is shaped by other needs as well, such as, in this case, the need to convey the penguin’s size and identity, even while maintaining a high level of efficiency. Kello observes that the linguistic laws discovered to hold good in penguin calls were first revealed through the study of text. As a result, they were long thought to be the result of the symbolic purpose of human language. This study, along with earlier ones, shows, he says, “that the laws are physical and not symbolic, because even penguins show them. Instead, the laws seem to reflect something deeper and more general about communication and information.” The environment of most animals demands quick and effective communication, and animal as well as human communication is geared to these requirements, making them fundamental to language structure. In the case of the current study, the researchers conclude, “We suggest that relationships between element duration, frequency of use and song size are mainly a consequence of vocal production constraints interacting with selective pressures for intersexual mate choice and territorial defence in dense colonies. Importantly, our results suggest for the first time that information compression can coexist with other sources of selection in a non-primate species with a small and relatively fixed vocal system.” Journal reference: Do penguins’ vocal sequences conform to linguistic laws? Livio Favaro, Marco Gamba, Eleonora Cresta, Elena Fumagalli, Francesca Bandoli, Cristina Pilenga, Valentina Isaja, Nicolas Mathevon and David Reby Published:05 February 2020, https://doi.org/10.1098/rsbl.2019.0589



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