Scientists use human stem cells to make pain-killing neurons

Scientists use human stem cells to make pain-killing neurons

Researchers develop 'scar in a dish' model to closely mimic progressive organ scarring Published today in the peer-reviewed journal Pain , the team used human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) derived from bone marrow to make pain-killing cells in the lab, then put them into the spinal cord of mice with serious neuropathic pain. The development of iPSC won a Nobel Prize in 2012. "Remarkably, the stem-cell neurons promoted lasting pain relief without side effects," co-senior author Dr Leslie Caron said. "It means transplant therapy could be an effective and long-lasting treatment for neuropathic pain. It is very exciting." John Manion, a PhD student and lead author of the paper said: Because we can pick where we put our pain-killing neurons, we can target only the parts of the body that are in pain. This means our approach can have fewer side effects." The stem cells used were derived from adult blood samples. The total cost of chronic pain in Australia in 2018 was estimated to be $139.3 billion. Source: University of Sydney Journal reference: Manion, J., et al. (2020) Human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived GABAergic interneuron transplants attenuate neuropathic pain. Pain . doi.org/10.1097/j.pain. 1733 .



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