'Smart' bandages could facilitate healing of hard-to-treat wounds

'Smart' bandages could facilitate healing of hard-to-treat wounds

High testosterone in women ups risk for cancer, diabetes, and metabolic disease Given the range of processes necessary of wound healing, different medications are needed at different stages of tissue regeneration. The bandage--a wearable device--can deliver medicine with minimal invasiveness. With the platform, the provider can wirelessly control the release of multiple drugs delivered through the miniature needles. These needles are able to penetrate into deeper layers of the wound bed with minimal pain and inflammation. This method proved to be more effective for wound closure and hair growth as compared to the topical administration of drugs, and is also minimally invasive. The research, recently published in the Advanced Functional Materials journal, was first conducted on cells and later on diabetic mice with full thickness skin injury. With this technology, the mice showed signs of complete healing and lack of scar formation--showing the bandages' ability to significantly improve the rate and quality of wound healing in diabetic animals. These findings can potentially replace existing wound care systems and significantly reduce the morbidity of chronic wounds--which will change the way diabetic wounds are treated. Tamayol recently applied for a patent for this technology. Source: University of Connecticut Journal reference: Derakhshandeh, H, et al. (2020) A Wirelessly Controlled Smart Bandage with 3D‐Printed Miniaturized Needle Arrays. Advanced Functional Materials . doi.org/10.1002/adfm.201905544 .



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