The Medical News

The Medical News

Of three possible ways for people to deliver the life-saving antidote naloxone to a person experiencing an opioid overdose, the use of a nasal spray was the quickest and easiest according to research conducted by William Eggleston, clinical assistant professor at Binghamton University, State University of New York, and colleagues at SUNY Upstate Medical University. Access to naloxone is a priority for reducing opioid deaths, but as naloxone moves closer to approval for sale over the counter, little was known about how easy and effectively the general population could administer it in an opioid overdose situation, according to Eggleston, with Binghamton University's School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences. Eggleston had done prior research in which untrained people were asked to administer naloxone after completing a naloxone training video, and most were successful, he said. "We wondered if we would get similar results when individuals had no training or indication of how to do it." Participants in the study were randomly assigned to administer naloxone to a manikin using one of three different methods: a preloaded nasal spray, an intramuscular shot or an improvised nasal atomizer kit that requires a bit of assembly before use. All three types are used by naloxone community programs in the United States. We had a station with a manikin and as people came up to check out the booth, we asked if they were interested in helping out with the study. Our goal was to see if there was a method that was the most intuitive." William Eggleston, clinical assistant professor, Binghamton University Related Stories



Also in Industry News

How to decide whether or not to start treatment for prostate cancer?
How to decide whether or not to start treatment for prostate cancer?

0 Comments

How to decide whether or not to start treatment for prostate cancer?

Read More

Analysis of the SARS-CoV-2 proteome via visual tools
Analysis of the SARS-CoV-2 proteome via visual tools

0 Comments

Analysis of the SARS-CoV-2 proteome via visual tools

Read More

$65m investment increases British Patient Capital’s exposure to life sciences and health technology
$65m investment increases British Patient Capital’s exposure to life sciences and health technology

0 Comments

$65m investment increases British Patient Capital’s exposure to life sciences and health technology

Read More