The Medical News

The Medical News

By Angela Betsaida B. Laguipo, BSN Jan 2 2020 Most children in North America consume cows-milk every day. With the rising rates of obesity in the US, doctors recommend that children who are 2 years old and below should consume reduced-fat cows-milk to reduce weight gain and its associated complications. Now, researchers have found that children who drink whole milk have a 40-percent reduced risk of being overweight or obese compared to those who drink reduced-fat milk. A team of researchers in St Michael's Hospital in Toronto, Canada wanted to evaluate the link between cow-milk fat consumption and the risk of being overweight or obese in children aged one to 18 years old. The research, which was published in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, analyzed 28 studies from seven countries, involving about 21,000 children. Image Credit: New Africa / Shutterstock.com Lower risk of obesity The researchers found that those who drank reduced-fat milk have a reduced risk of adiposity (weight gain) and are less likely to develop obesity. Also, 18 of the 28 studies showed that children who consumed whole milk had a 40 percent lower risk of becoming overweight or obese. The researchers stated that that ten out of the 28 studies did not find a connection between consuming full-fat milk and a lower risk of becoming obese. However, they said that none of the studies have shown that drinking low-fat milk may lower the risk of obesity. The findings of the study test current Canadian and international guidelines that recommend children to drink reduced-fat cow milk instead of whole milk when they reach the age of two onwards to lower the risk of obesity. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends children switch from whole-fat milk to reduced-fat milk at 2 years old while the NHS guidelines issued similar recommendations, but also it said that the fat in milk gives calories for children and contains important vitamins. The majority of children in Canada and the United States consume cow's milk on a daily basis and it is a major contributor of dietary fat for many children. In our review, children following the current recommendation of switching to reduced-fat milk at age two were not leaner than those consuming whole milk.” Dr. Jonathon Maguire, Lead Author & Pediatrician at St. Michael's Hospital Further research will be needed to confirm the findings Related Stories



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