Using micromotors to improve dental patient care

Using micromotors to improve dental patient care

Download PDF Copy Jan 10 2020 If you’ve ever suffered from a toothache, you know that the pain it causes can be life-disrupting. Alarmingly, there are growing numbers of people across the UK waiting for dental treatment in pain. The increasing sophistication of micromotors is having a major impact on dentistry, leading to faster and improved treatment. Here, Stewart Goulding, managing director at mechatronic drive system supplier EMS Ltd explains how micromotors are improving patient care. Oral health is directly related to overall health. The World Health Organization (WHO) recognizes that poor oral health can negatively impact both physical and mental wellbeing by causing chronic pain, hindering speech and preventing consumption of certain foods. It is clear that good oral hygiene is crucial for a high quality of life. Tools of the trade Dentistry is a skilled profession. The handling of a patient’s teeth requires extreme care and precision and effective treatment lies in the hands of a qualified dentist and the tools they use. For this reason, increasingly high performance equipment is needed to improve patient treatment. Many dental applications such as polishing, cleaning and cutting — even the adjustments that can be made to the patient’s chair — are powered by micromotors. A patient’s mouth is a small working space, so dental tools must be handheld and designed to fit comfortably into the patient without obstructing the dentist’s view of their teeth. Chatter is an issue faced by dental tools using traditional air turbine systems, caused by ball bearing wear in the air turbine that leads to bur wobble. The older the bearings, the more the bur can wobble. As chatter impacts the precision and degree of effort dentists must take when performing procedures, opting for an electric-motor controlled tool can help to improve accuracy and make the dentist’s job easier. Without chatter, the bur is in contact with a patient’s teeth for less time, which also reduces the chance of causing tooth sensitivity. Related Stories



Also in Industry News

How to decide whether or not to start treatment for prostate cancer?
How to decide whether or not to start treatment for prostate cancer?

0 Comments

How to decide whether or not to start treatment for prostate cancer?

Read More

Analysis of the SARS-CoV-2 proteome via visual tools
Analysis of the SARS-CoV-2 proteome via visual tools

0 Comments

Analysis of the SARS-CoV-2 proteome via visual tools

Read More

$65m investment increases British Patient Capital’s exposure to life sciences and health technology
$65m investment increases British Patient Capital’s exposure to life sciences and health technology

0 Comments

$65m investment increases British Patient Capital’s exposure to life sciences and health technology

Read More